Creating pre-Heresy marines: Part 6 – Mark V Power Armour

Continuing the guides for producing pre-Heresy armour, concluding the series of armour marks we have Mark V. This is the most modern armour available for this period and is suitably named Heresy armour!

Components required for this tutorial:

A plain shoulder pad and a studded pad if you have one available. They’re hard to get hold of in bulk, so I will cover how to make your own later in the tutorial.

A Chaos Space Marine backpack.

Mark VII legs.

The Mark V helmet can be converted from any of the below. Mark VII helmets or the variant Mark V helmets from Chaos marines.

Mark V chests are readibly available from Chaos Space Marine sets.

A pair of modern marine arms – without gloves!

Creating Mark V Power Armour:

Starting with the legs, clean up any mold lines and remove and objects from the lower legs – pipes in the case.

The top of the knee pads need to be reduced and brought to a slight point, like a triangle.

Slice the highlighted areas above, leaving a small horizontal line at either end.

The foot plates tend to be a single piece, so the top step can be cut or filed smooth.

Also (optionally) the back of the leg armour comes a little lower than Mark VII armour, so to achieve this place a ball of putty in the heel area.

Spread the putty with a sculpting tool to fill the gap.

Then smooth the putty down, starting with the tool on the plastic above and moving the flat of the tool down. Don’t worry about any overhang as this will be left to trim once the putty is cured.

Leave the putty to cure and then take a knife to trim it horizontally from the edges of the plastic armour. Then cut it at a slight angle from the middle to create a slighty curve.

Returning to the knee pads, the bottom should be cut to an almost sraight, horizontal line.

This will inevitably create a gap in the shin armour, so roll a small sausage of putty and place it below the knee pad.

Spread the putty into the gap and strike it smooth against the shin plate.

Next you will need to chose which helmet to use. Below are guides for the 3 helmets shown at the start. Beginning with the studded Heresy helmet:

The cheek area protrudes too much so needs to be trimmed down, with the crest of the helmet defined around the eyes. The marked areas below require cutting or filing.

Use a sharp knife to scrape a vertical edge to the helmet between the eyes and side of the helmet.

To create the nose plate, add a small ball of putty to the area.

Press the putty flat against the helmet.

Then use a knife to cut the excess from the sides and to mark a steo between the nose and mouth piece.

The back of the helmet needs a strip down the middle. Place a sausage of putty from the back trim, up along the helmet as so:

Smooth out the surface with a sculpting tool and let the putty cure.

Once cured, simply cut the putty to shape with nice flat edges:

To convert a standard Mark VII helmet, first reduce the trim down the middle of the helmet. Cut the area amrked in black below:

File the area that has been cut to keep the large surface of the helmet smooth.

Similar to the previous helmet, place a piece of putty on the nose and smooth it flat against the helmet.

Cut the putty excess at the sides and create a flat edge where it meets the mouth piece.

To convert the horned helmet, first remove the horns completely, leaving the discs that sit at the sides of the helmet.

Mark vetical lines along these discs, using the bottom edge as a guide.

Cut away the sides, ensuring the cut areas meet the existing trim around teh back of the helmet.

Trim the corners and file a slight curve into the top of the cut area.

The emphasised cheeks require cutting on this helmet. Cut or file them away and scrape a definition line vertically behind the eyes.

Here’s how the three helmets look against our legs and chest pieces.

Chaos mark V helmet:

Horned Mark V Chaos helmet:

Standard Mark VII helmet:

Come back soon for the next part of this tutorial where I’ll be covering the armour in an unhealthy amount of studs!

View part 2.

Whitehorn

Aint nothing but a horn

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